Material Dispersion

Material Dispersion. Structured Water for Los Angeles. 8 ounces of purified spring water in a glass bottle sealed with an aluminum cap. Blessed each day for the duration of True Light. September 1 - December 1, 2012.

Material Dispersion. Structured Water for Los Angeles. 8 ounces of purified spring water in a glass bottle sealed with an aluminum cap. Blessed each day for the duration of True Light. September 1 - December 1, 2012.

Building on her interest in the transmission of a form through a contemplative act, Chavez created a sculptural work entitled Material Dispersion, a name which derives from the optical phenomenon observed when a beam of white light passes through a refractive object which causes different colors to refract at different angles, splitting it into a rainbow.

Chavez's work often has quasi-spiritual associations and is deeply psychological, as if she is attempting to give an image to the process by which an elevated state of consciousness assumes the form of physical matter. Recasting the notion of sculpture as an act that is metaphysical and inherently relational, Chavez draws upon elements from her own, private world. While investigating both the poetics and the science behind the processes of crafting structure in the materials of water and consciousness, Chavez blessed 90 8-ounce glass bottles of pure spring water each day over the course of the 90-day fast during her True Light performance. Each bottle has been dedicated to a person who has impacted the artist's life. The bottles are gifted to these individuals as her creative journey evolves. Telling the story of a nomadic artist, the finished sculptural work consists of 90 bottles which are dispersed throughout the world.

The bottles are displayed in a variety of geometric configurations: hexagonal matrices, strictly gridded tableaux, or in perfect concentric circles. Notions of equilibrium, gravity, and becoming are foregrounded in her assemblages, which harness what she has described as the "natural life of materials." The bottles illustrate the principle of chromatic dispersion over time by refracting the passage of light on architectural surfaces as light shifts throughout a space.